Making Bone Grease or Puiñiq

Glossary of Inupiaq terms

Akigaun
The caribou antler shovel, used to transfer the fire-heated rocks from the fire to the piqtalik.

Arvik
The flat stone anvil upon which the bones were crushed.

Ayapkaun
The double thumbed, caribou skin mitten worn by the person who was holding and crushing the bones.

Igavaun
A large size piqtalik used for boiling water and cooking

Imiġaq
The broth that resulted from boiling the bones.  Like the uningu, it was consumed at the end of the boiling process.

Imnaim Nagrua
The horn of the Dall mountain sheep

Imnaiq
The Dall mountain sheep (Ovis dalli dalli)

Isugluk

The leg bone joint of the caribou, which is said to yield the best quality grease.

Kaugun Aatqan

Another name by which this mitten was called.

Kaugvik
Another name for the anvil stone.

Kaukkat
The small pieces of bone that result from the crushing process, and which are then boiled to obtain their grease content, also the exhausted bone fragments from which the grease had been boiled out.

Kautaq
The traditional stone hammer used to crush the bones into small pieces.

Napautat/Napauttat
The three-legged tripod used to suspend the utkusik over the open fire.

Nigukkaq
The rumen, or, digested stomach contents, which helped flavor the puiñiq.

Patiq
The rich nutritious bone marrow that was removed from the bones prior to their being crushed.

Piqtalik
The traditional spruce wood bucket in which the bone fragments were boiled by adding fire heated rocks to the water filled container.

Puiñiq
Grease produced by boiling the crushed bones of caribou, sheep, or other large animals.

Puuq
The storage poke, made from a caribou stomach, in which puiñiq was stored for later use.

Qapukłuk
A brown bubbly froth produced during the boiling process.  It was considered a special treat for children and elders to snack on.

Qayuuttaq
The large sheephorn ladle used to skim the floating bone grease from the surface of the boiling water.

Qisaġuaq
The stomach of the caribou, used to make the puuq.

Saunigluk
The main body bones of the caribou, which are said to yield a lesser quality of grease.

Tuttum Nakkutiŋik
The broad front palm of an antler.  The name stems from the fact that the shovel projects out over the nose and between the eyes making the caribou cross-eyed looking at it